New Orleans History -- Lake Pontchartrain
Monday, March 27, 2017
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1852 - Uncle Tom's Cabin

Chapter 22, Volume 2, Uncle Tom's Cabin, (Cambridge: Houghton Mifflin, 1891.) 'At this time in our story, the whole St. Clare establishment is, for the time being, removed to their villa on Lake Pontchartrain. The heats of summer had driven all who were able to leave the sultry and unhealthy city, to seek the shores of the lake, and its cool sea-breezes. St. Clare's villa was an East Indian cottage, surrounded by light verandahs of bamboo-work, and opening on all sides into gardens and pleasure-grounds. The common sitting-room opened on to a large garden, fragrant with every picturesque plant and flower of the tropics, where winding paths ran down to the very shores of the lake, whose silvery sheet of water lay there, rising and falling in the sunbeams,--a picture never for an hour the same, yet every hour more beautiful.

It is now one of those intensely golden sunsets which kindles the whole horizon into one blaze of glory, and makes the water another sky. The lake lay in rosy or golden streaks, save where white-winged vessels glided hither and thither, like so many spirits, and little golden stars twinkled through the glow, and looked down at themselves as they trembled in the water. Tom and Eva were seated on a little mossy seat, in an arbor, at the foot of the garden. It was Sunday evening, and Eva's Bible lay open on her knee. She read,--'And I saw a sea of glass, mingled with fire.' 'Tom,' said Eva, suddenly stopping, and pointing to the lake, 'there 't is.' 'What, Miss Eva?' 'Don't you see,--there?' said the child, pointing to the glassy water, which, as it rose and fell, reflected the golden glow of the sky. 'There's a `sea of glass, mingled with fire.'' 'True enough, Miss Eva,' said Tom...'